Mean Culpa

In modern times, Mea Culpa has become a noble declaration of admitting, accepting the making of a mistake by one’s own actions, and decisive “fault”, which is formed when diligence is disregarded, and harms way is considered a proper risk for the reward of the actions. Interestingly enough, the word culpa in latin is “fault”, and mea is “my/mine”.

We live in a world of syntax, so let’s shorten it all. Keep it real, eh?

Word wise.

And, is simply n.

You n me, them n us, m n m’s.

Mea, or my and n. Mean.

Culpa, fault.

Mean fault?

Me an Fault?

Could Fate be Fault under duress?

So the choices we make, or as Gus claims, mean culpa – creates a poetic tragedy of sorts.

“Observation fully confirms what reflection teaches us on this subject: Savage man and civilized man differ so much in their inmost heart and inclinations that what constitutes the supreme happiness of the one would reduce the other to despair. The first breathes nothing but repose and freedom, he wants only to live and remain idle, and even the Stoic’s ataraxia does not approximate his profound indifference to everything else. By contrast, the Citizen, forever active, sweats and scurries, constantly in search of ever more strenuous occupations: he works to the death, even rushes toward it in order to be in a position to live, or renounces life in order to acquire immortality. He courts the great whom he hates, and the rich whom he despises; he spares nothing to attain the honor of serving them; he vaingloriously boasts of his baseness and of their protection and, proud of his slavery, he speaks contemptuously of those who have not the honor of sharing it.” Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Discourse on Inequality

*abide*